Nevada

Nevada State Department of Business & Industry

The Silver State of Nevada has seen a population boom over the past decade. A census in 2000 pegged the population at under two million. As of 2008, there were more than 2.6 million people in NV. The state brings in about $127 billion in gross product annually.

Nevada is a study in contrast. The two largest cities, Reno and Las Vegas, attract tourists, international high rollers, and conventioneers to glittering casinos. The vast majority of the state, however, consists of stark, barely populated desert. Nevada’s economy depends in a large part on gaming and tourism. But the state supports an array of other industries, including mining, food processing, and various agricultural businesses. The military also owns and operates many facilities (some of them top secret) throughout NV. Cattle and sheep farming comprise a central part of the state’s agricultural economy.

The Nevada State Department of Business & Industry (a subdivision of the state’s labor commissioner’s office) oversees employment violations in Nevada such as:

  1. Discrimination. When employers treat workers or job candidates differently due to their race, gender, nationality, religion, disability, or other protected status, the agency can be an advocate to establish fair treatment.

  2. Wage and hour violations. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers must pay their employees as agreed, including paying overtime for eligible staff. They also must classify workers correctly and process timecards accurately. The state can consider discrepancies in such practices to be wage theft.

The Office of the Labor Commissioner can schedule hearings to assess case claims. The department deals with additional employment-related complaints, including:

  1. ADA compliance. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires employers to supply “reasonable accommodations” to individuals with disabilities, so they can safely perform job duties.

  2. Harassment. Sexual harassment represents a serious issue in the workplace. Any employee experiencing unwanted sexual advances or witnessing offensive behavior can appeal to the Commission for redress.

  3. Retaliation. Employers occasionally penalize employees who complain to authorities or integrity hotlines with demotions, layoffs, and less appealing job duties. Such retaliatory measures are against Nevada law.

The Labor Commissioner often works hand in hand with the Nevada Equal Rights Commission to enforce anti-harassment and anti-discrimination laws.

Las Vegas, Nevada – also known as Sin City – sees its fair share of unique and bizarre employment discrimination, harassment, and retaliation cases. Casinos naturally attract risk-takers and freewheelers. The laissez-faire attitudes of Vegas employers can lead to trouble. For instance, in March 2009, the owners of a chain of restaurants in Vegas had to pay nearly half a million dollars for allowing racial discrimination against African-American employees and wait staff, whom management and colleagues routinely harassed and berated. This case only proves that employers in Nevada must continue to work toward a better environment for employees.

If you have a race or gender based discrimination problem with your Nevada employer, or, for that matter, any behavior you feel abuses your rights as an employee, a Nevada employment attorney can offer guidance. Connect with a legal professional today to discuss your potential case.